Book: A Man Named Naus


After an incredible weekend of celebrating with our friends Igor and Chelsea at their wedding, my boyfriend Cullen and I are ready to settle back into another week of work.  Changes may be coming soon for me on the work front, but I’ll talk about that when the time comes.  As for now, I want to post a preview of the book idea I’ve been thinking about for the last six months.  The genre is fantasy fiction and I envision my target audience to be the same type of people that would read things like Patrick Rothfuss’s Name of the Wind (as seen on my list here), JK Rowling’s Harry Potter and Neil Gaiman’s Stardust – partly because those authors have inspired some of my work.  I also hope to bring people into fantasy that have never had an interest in it before.  We’ll see how it goes.

As my confidence grows from posting here and on Figment, I will continue to share sections of my writing.  Today though, I hope you enjoy this:

The man walked swiftly, even footed, through the market.  He cut corners sharply around carriages, booths, and chatting people, but never touched a single thing.  His coat didn’t even brush against the wall of the tavern as he whipped past the edge of it to head up the next street.  He was all too aware what a confrontation or delay could cost him.

His name was Naus.  He was tall and slender, but visibly muscular, with dark brown hair, smooth darkened skin, and eyes the color of the shallow seas in summer, and just as clear.  If he were to set his gaze upon you, you would feel as though he could read your thoughts with no effort at all… and perhaps he could.  His eyes were what set him apart, too.  The unmistakable blue was a sign of true power, even in a town like Tha’lassos, where anyone was likely to bewitch you.

His tension today didn’t arise from the worry of being followed, although he’d known for several rhythms now that someone, or something, was keeping tabs on him.  The stress he felt was from the looming deadline for returning to his employer with news.  He had good news at least.  But now is not the time to be anticipating that discussion, he thought.  The meeting was scheduled for dusk, so he knew he only had minutes to find the address.

The market gave way to less crowded streets containing shops, taverns, and pubs, but mostly small apartments.  Naus swept past the buildings, which rose two or three stories high in every direction, all with rather shabby exteriors.  Very few ever noticed the appearances of the buildings anymore and no one cared, nor should they.  Everything was weather-beaten in the town, even the people.

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About jmmack

Full-time swim coach and pool program manager in the Seattle area. Swimmer, writer, cross-stitcher, HP fan, wife, sister, auntie of two nephews, human to a feisty Jack-Russell mix.
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6 Responses to Book: A Man Named Naus

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  5. verasilver says:

    Loved this extract! I will have to read more of your blog :)

    • jmwalker17 says:

      Not sure why I didn’t respond to this earlier! Thanks so much for following and checking back to read and comment =) This is the book idea I’ve been thinking about/working on since March – I’m going to try to post about Naus at least once a week.

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